dendrochronology

[ den-droh-kruh-nol-uh-jee ]
/ ˌdɛn droʊ krəˈnɒl ə dʒi /

noun

the science dealing with the study of the annual rings of trees in determining the dates and chronological order of past events.

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Origin of dendrochronology

First recorded in 1925–30; dendro- + chronology

OTHER WORDS FROM dendrochronology

den·dro·chron·o·log·i·cal [den-droh-kron-l-oj-i-kuhl], /ˌdɛn droʊˌkrɒn lˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl/, adjectiveden·dro·chron·o·log·i·cal·ly, adverbden·dro·chro·nol·o·gist, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for dendrochronology

dendrochronology
/ (ˌdɛndrəʊkrəˈnɒlədʒɪ) /

noun

the study of the annual rings of trees, used esp to date past events

Derived forms of dendrochronology

dendrochronological (ˌdɛndrəʊˌkrɒnəˈlɒdʒɪkəl), adjectivedendrochronologist, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for dendrochronology

dendrochronology
[ dĕn′drō-krə-nŏlə-jē ]

The study of growth rings in trees for the purpose of analyzing past climate conditions or determining the dates of past events. Because trees grow more slowly in periods of drought or other environmental stress than they do under more favorable conditions, the size of the rings they produce varies. Analyzing the pattern of a tree's rings provides information about the environmental changes that took place during the period in which it was growing. Matching the pattern in trees whose age is known to the pattern in wood found at an archaeological site can establish the age at which the wood was cut and thus the approximate date of the site. By comparing living trees with old lumber and finding overlapping ring patterns, scientists have established chronological records for some species that go back as far as 9,000 years.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.