deodand

[ dee-uh-dand ]
/ ˈdi əˌdænd /

noun English Law.

(before 1846) an animal or article that, having been the immediate cause of the death of a human being, was forfeited to the crown to be applied to pious uses.

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Origin of deodand

1520–30; <Medieval Latin deōdandum (a thing) to be given to God <Latin deō to God (dative singular of deus) + dandum to be given (neuter gerund of dare to give)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for deodand

British Dictionary definitions for deodand

deodand
/ (ˈdiːəʊˌdænd) /

noun

English law (formerly) a thing that had caused a person's death and was forfeited to the crown for a charitable purpose: abolished 1862

Word Origin for deodand

C16: from Anglo-French deodande, from Medieval Latin deōdandum, from Latin Deō dandum (something) to be given to God, from deus god + dare to give
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012