desired

[dih-zahyuh rd]

adjective

yearned or wished for; coveted.
deemed correct or proper; selected; required: The chef added stock until the sauce reached the desired consistency.

Origin of desired

Middle English word dating back to 1250–1300; see origin at desire, -ed2
Related formsun·de·sired, adjectivewell-de·sired, adjective

desire

[dih-zahyuhr]

verb (used with object), de·sired, de·sir·ing.

to wish or long for; crave; want.
to express a wish to obtain; ask for; request: The mayor desires your presence at the next meeting.

noun

a longing or craving, as for something that brings satisfaction or enjoyment: a desire for fame.
an expressed wish; request.
something desired.
sexual appetite or a sexual urge.

Origin of desire

1200–50; Middle English desiren < Old French desirer < Latin dēsīderāre; see desiderate
Related formsde·sired·ly [dih-zahyuhrd-lee, -zahy-rid-] /dɪˈzaɪərd li, -ˈzaɪ rɪd-/, adverbde·sired·ness, nounde·sire·less, adjectivede·sir·er, nounde·sir·ing·ly, adverbo·ver·de·sire, nounself-de·sire, nounun·de·sir·ing, adjective

Synonyms for desire

Synonym study

1. See wish. 3. Desire, craving, longing, yearning suggest feelings that impel one to the attainment or possession of something. Desire is a strong feeling, worthy or unworthy, that impels to the attainment or possession of something that is (in reality or imagination) within reach: a desire for success. Craving implies a deep and imperative wish for something, based on a sense of need and hunger: a craving for food, companionship. A longing is an intense wish, generally repeated or enduring, for something that is at the moment beyond reach but may be attainable at some future time: a longing to visit Europe. Yearning suggests persistent, uneasy, and sometimes wistful or tender longing: a yearning for one's native land.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for desired

Contemporary Examples of desired

Historical Examples of desired

  • She awoke Milza, and desired that the household might be summoned.

    Philothea

    Lydia Maria Child

  • Her Percival courted with results that left nothing to be desired.

    The Spenders

    Harry Leon Wilson

  • The daughter of Pharaoh saw the youth and desired him for her husband.

    Ancient Man

    Hendrik Willem van Loon

  • He was ill, and he desired to speak with his still beloved minister.

  • I desired her to give it into her own hand, when nobody was by.

    Clarissa, Volume 1 (of 9)

    Samuel Richardson


British Dictionary definitions for desired

desire

verb (tr)

to wish or long for; crave; want
to express a wish or make a request for; ask for

noun

a wish or longing; craving
an expressed wish; request
sexual appetite; lust
a person or thing that is desired
Related formsRelated adjective: orectic
Derived Formsdesirer, noun

Word Origin for desire

C13: from Old French desirer, from Latin dēsīderāre to desire earnestly; see desiderate
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for desired

desire

n.

c.1300, from Old French desir, from desirer (see desire (v.)); sense of "lust" is first recorded mid-14c.

desire

v.

early 13c., from Old French desirrer (12c.) "wish, desire, long for," from Latin desiderare "long for, wish for; demand, expect," original sense perhaps "await what the stars will bring," from the phrase de sidere "from the stars," from sidus (genitive sideris) "heavenly body, star, constellation" (but see consider). Related: Desired; desiring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with desired

desire

see leave a lot to be desired.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.