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detraction

[dih-trak-shuh n]
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noun
  1. the act of disparaging or belittling the reputation or worth of a person, work, etc.
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Origin of detraction

1300–50; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Late Latin dētractiōn- (stem of dētractiō), equivalent to Latin dētract(us) (see detract) + -iōn- -ion
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for detraction

harm, aspersion, denigration, slam, scandal, hit, vilification, obloquy, lie, defamation, revilement, damage, injustice, libel, calumny, injury, deprecation, insinuation, derogation, minimization

Examples from the Web for detraction

Historical Examples of detraction

  • It is there one lives exempt from the assaults of censure, detraction, and calumny.

    The History of Louisiana

    Le Page Du Pratz

  • The straitest ties of blood could not secure any one from his detraction.

  • It was no detraction from its merit that it might be all acting, for it was still "high art."

  • If I differ from high authority, I have not a thought of detraction.

  • Yet there should be no detraction from the fact that the heredity is strong.


British Dictionary definitions for detraction

detraction

noun
  1. a person, thing, circumstance, etc, that detracts
  2. the act of discrediting or detracting from another's reputation, esp by slander; disparagement
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for detraction

n.

mid-14c., from Old French detraccion "detraction, disparagement, denigration," from Latin detractionem (nominative detractio) "a drawing off," from past participle stem of detrahere "take down, pull down, disparage," from de- "down" (see de-) + trahere "to pull" (see tract (n.1)). The fem. form detractress is attested from 1716.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper