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View synonyms for devoid

devoid

[ dih-void ]

adjective

  1. not possessing, untouched by, void, or destitute (usually followed by of ).

    Synonyms: barren, bereft, destitute, wanting, lacking



verb (used with object)

  1. to deplete or strip of some quality or substance:

    imprisonment that devoids a person of humanity.

devoid

/ dɪˈvɔɪd /

adjective

  1. postpositivefoll byof destitute or void (of); free (from)


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Word History and Origins

Origin of devoid1

1350–1400; Middle English, originally past participle < Anglo-French, for Old French desvuidier to empty out, equivalent to des- dis- 1 + vuidier to empty, void
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Word History and Origins

Origin of devoid1

C15: originally past participle of devoid ( vb ) to remove, from Old French devoidier, from de- de- + voider to void
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Example Sentences

The prevalent use of gift registries would argue otherwise — but while they ensure that people get the stuff they want, they are devoid of any thought or sentiment.

The Greenbelt store was devoid of customers Saturday afternoon save for a preteen boy and his mom browsing the orderly rows of games, most bearing “pre-owned” stickers.

Nobody in their right mind would ever give a job to someone so completely devoid of the most rudimentary social skills.

Rivers’s lack of championship rings will likely invoke comparisons to Fouts, Dan Marino and Warren Moon, three Hall of Fame quarterbacks that are also devoid of a Super Bowl win.

They pointed the most powerful telescope in history, the Hubble Space Telescope, at a dark patch of sky devoid of known stars, gas, or galaxies.

This is comedy based on a cold humor, detached, euphemistic, devoid of any generosity.

Yes, it was a fairly disappointing year in music—one devoid of Goth teen prodigies, Yeezy, and galvanizing rock anthems.

The gift of candidates devoid of personality is that the character of the electorate has a chance to come through.

The wheel eventually wound up inventoried, “utterly devoid of its emotional significance” in a museum.

To Western eyes and ears, Sharia law seems devoid of respect for differences of opinion or complex moral thinking.

They jeered and sounded mournful notes without promise, devoid even of hope.

And being devoid of ambition, and striving not toward accomplishment, she drew satisfaction from the work in itself.

Like his fellow Marshals, Macdonald hated the Spanish war, which was a war of posts, and devoid of glory.

The children were left to her stepdaughter, herself still half a child, and devoid of all experience.

Baroudi was as totally devoid of ordinary scruples as the average well-bred Englishman is full of them.

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