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View synonyms for digress

digress

[ dih-gres, dahy- ]

verb (used without object)

  1. to deviate or wander away from the main topic or purpose in speaking or writing; depart from the principal line of argument, plot, study, etc.

    Synonyms: stray, ramble

  2. Archaic. to turn aside.


digress

/ daɪˈɡrɛs /

verb

  1. to depart from the main subject in speech or writing
  2. to wander from one's path or main direction


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Derived Forms

  • diˈgresser, noun
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Other Words From

  • di·gresser noun
  • di·gressing·ly adverb
  • redi·gress verb (used without object)
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Word History and Origins

Origin of digress1

First recorded in 1520–30; from Latin dīgressus “departed,” past participle of dīgredī “to go off, depart, digress,” from dī- di- 2 + -gredī (combining form of gradī “to go”; grade )
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Word History and Origins

Origin of digress1

C16: from Latin dīgressus turned aside, from dīgredī, from dis- apart + gradī to go
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Synonym Study

See deviate.
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Example Sentences

Eszterhas describes how Gibson often would digress from the topic at hand to rant about Grigorieva.

But I digress, enough with the “man who wears two masks” nonsense, as if Banville must justify writing mystery novels.

Do not digress; tell one story at a time; let no incident into your story which cannot answer the question, “Why are you here?”

I will digress a bit and explain how these stone-quarries were discovered.

While we are on that subject, just to digress for a moment, what was his attitude toward riding in open cars?

Let me now, however, turn to my tale, from which it is my intention in future to digress as seldom as possible.

It may be of interest to digress here briefly in order to speak of these little known though common forms of life.

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