dilatory

[dil-uh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee]
See more synonyms for dilatory on Thesaurus.com
adjective
  1. tending to delay or procrastinate; slow; tardy.
  2. intended to cause delay, gain time, or defer decision: a dilatory strategy.

Origin of dilatory

1250–1300; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Latin dīlātōrius, equivalent to dīlā-, suppletive stem of differre to postpone (see differ) + -tōrius -tory1
Related formsdil·a·to·ri·ly, adverbdil·a·to·ri·ness, nounun·dil·a·to·ri·ly, adverbun·dil·a·to·ry, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for dilatory

Contemporary Examples of dilatory

  • Decision making is slow, acquisition processes are dilatory, and maintenance of the equipment bought is poor.

    The Daily Beast logo
    India’s Tryst with Terror

    Kanwal Sibal

    September 9, 2011

Historical Examples of dilatory


British Dictionary definitions for dilatory

dilatory

adjective
  1. tending or inclined to delay or waste time
  2. intended or designed to waste time or defer action
Derived Formsdilatorily, adverbdilatoriness, noun

Word Origin for dilatory

C15: from Late Latin dīlātōrius inclined to delay, from differre to postpone; see differ
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for dilatory
adj.

late 15c., from Late Latin dilatorius, from dilator "procrastinator," from dilatus, serving as past participle of differe "delay" (see defer).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper