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dire

[ dahyuh r ]
/ daɪər /
|
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adjective, dir·er, dir·est.

causing or involving great fear or suffering; dreadful; terrible: a dire calamity.
indicating trouble, disaster, misfortune, or the like: dire predictions about the stock market.
urgent; desperate: in dire need of food.

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Nearby words

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Origin of dire

First recorded in 1560–70, dire is from the Latin word dīrus fearful, unlucky
Related formsdire·ly, adverbdire·ness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for dire

British Dictionary definitions for dire

dire

/ (daɪə) /

adjective (usually prenominal)

Also: direful disastrous; fearful
desperate; urgenta dire need
foreboding disaster; ominousa dire warning
Derived Formsdirely, adverbdireness, noun

Word Origin for dire

C16: from Latin dīrus ominous, fearful; related to Greek deos fear
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for dire

dire


adj.

1560s, from Latin dirus "fearful, awful, boding ill," of unknown origin; perhaps from Oscan and Umbrian and perhaps cognate with Greek deinos, from PIE root *dwei-.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper