dissipate

[ dis-uh-peyt ]
/ ˈdɪs əˌpeɪt /

verb (used with object), dis·si·pat·ed, dis·si·pat·ing.

to scatter in various directions; disperse; dispel.
to spend or use wastefully or extravagantly; squander; deplete: to dissipate one's talents; to dissipate a fortune on high living.

verb (used without object), dis·si·pat·ed, dis·si·pat·ing.

to become scattered or dispersed; be dispelled; disintegrate: The sun shone and the mist dissipated.
to indulge in extravagant, intemperate, or dissolute pleasure.

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Origin of dissipate

First recorded in 1525–35; from Latin dissipātus (past participle of dissipāre, dissupāre “to scatter”); see -ate1

SYNONYMS FOR dissipate

ANTONYMS FOR dissipate

1, 3 unite.

synonym study for dissipate

1. See scatter.

OTHER WORDS FROM dissipate

dis·si·pat·er, dis·si·pa·tor, noundis·si·pa·tive, adjectivedis·si·pa·tiv·i·ty [dis-uh-puh-tiv-i-tee], /ˌdɪs ə pəˈtɪv ɪ ti/, nounnon·dis·si·pa·tive, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for dissipate

British Dictionary definitions for dissipate

dissipate
/ (ˈdɪsɪˌpeɪt) /

verb

to exhaust or be exhausted by dispersion
(tr) to scatter or break up
(intr) to indulge in the pursuit of pleasure

Derived forms of dissipate

dissipater or dissipator, noundissipative, adjective

Word Origin for dissipate

C15: from Latin dissipāre to disperse, from dis- 1 + supāre to throw
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012