district

[ dis-trikt ]
/ ˈdɪs trɪkt /

noun

a division of territory, as of a country, state, or county, marked off for administrative, electoral, or other purposes.
a region or locality: the theater district; the Lake District.
British. a subdivision of a county or a town.
the District, the District of Columbia; Washington, D.C.

verb (used with object)

to divide into districts.

Nearby words

  1. distributive education,
  2. distributive law,
  3. distributive property,
  4. distributor,
  5. distributorship,
  6. district attorney,
  7. district council,
  8. district court,
  9. district court judge,
  10. district high school

Origin of district

1605–15; (< F) < Medieval Latin distrīctus exercise of justice, (area of) jurisdiction, derivative of Latin distringere to stretch out (see distrain), equivalent to di- di-2 + strig- (base of stringere to bind, tie) + -tus suffix of verbal action

Related formsin·ter·dis·trict, adjectiveout·dis·trict, nounpre·dis·trict, noun

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for district


British Dictionary definitions for district

district

/ (ˈdɪstrɪkt) /

noun

verb

(tr) to divide into districts

Word Origin for district

C17: from Medieval Latin districtus area of jurisdiction, from Latin distringere to stretch out; see distrain

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for district

district

n.

1610s, "territory under the jurisdiction of a lord or officer," from French district (16c.), from Medieval Latin districtus "restraining of offenders, jurisdiction," then under the feudal system "area of jurisdiction," noun use of past participle of Latin distringere "hinder, detain" (see distress). Used vaguely of "any tract of land" from 1712. District attorney attested by 1789, American English.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper