dizzying

[ diz-ee-ing ]
/ ˈdɪz i ɪŋ /

adjective

making or tending to make one dizzy: The tower rose to dizzying heights.

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Origin of dizzying

First recorded in 1795–1805; dizzy + -ing2

OTHER WORDS FROM dizzying

diz·zy·ing·ly, adverb

Words nearby dizzying

Definition for dizzying (2 of 2)

dizzy
[ diz-ee ]
/ ˈdɪz i /

adjective, diz·zi·er, diz·zi·est.

having a sensation of whirling and a tendency to fall; giddy; vertiginous.
bewildered; confused.
causing giddiness or confusion: a dizzy height.
heedless; thoughtless.
Informal. foolish; silly.

verb (used with object), diz·zied, diz·zy·ing.

to make dizzy.

Origin of dizzy

before 900; Middle English dysy, Old English dysig foolish; cognate with Low German düsig stupefied

OTHER WORDS FROM dizzy

diz·zi·ly, adverbdiz·zi·ness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for dizzying

British Dictionary definitions for dizzying

dizzy
/ (ˈdɪzɪ) /

adjective -zier or -ziest

affected with a whirling or reeling sensation; giddy
mentally confused or bewildered
causing or tending to cause vertigo or bewilderment
informal foolish or flighty

verb -zies, -zying or -zied

(tr) to make dizzy

Derived forms of dizzy

dizzily, adverbdizziness, noun

Word Origin for dizzy

Old English dysig silly; related to Old High German tusīg weak, Old Norse dos quiet
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012