definitions
  • synonyms

away

[ uh-wey ]
/ əˈweɪ /
||
SEE MORE SYNONYMS FOR away ON THESAURUS.COM

adverb

adjective

Verb Phrases

do away with,
  1. to get rid of; abolish; stop.
  2. to kill: Bluebeard did away with all his wives.

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RELATED WORDS

abolish, cancel, discard, discontinue, eliminate, exterminate, finish, kill, liquidate, murder, remove, slaughter, slay

Nearby words

awardee, aware, awareness, awash, awato, away, away goal, away-going crop, awayday, awb, awe

Idioms

    away with,
    1. take away: Away with him!
    2. go away! leave!: Away with you!
    where away? (of something sighted from a ship) in which direction? where?

Origin of away

before 950; Middle English; Old English aweg, reduction of on weg. See on, a-1, way1

Definition for do away with (2 of 2)

Origin of do

1
before 900; Middle English, Old English dōn; cognate with Dutch doen, German tun; akin to Latin -dere to put, facere to make, do, Greek tithénai to set, put, Sanskrit dadhāti (he) puts
SYNONYMS FOR do
1, 27 act.
Can be confuseddew do dew

Synonym study

3. Do, accomplish, achieve mean to bring some action to a conclusion. Do is the general word: He did a great deal of hard work. Accomplish and achieve both connote successful completion of an undertaking. Accomplish emphasizes attaining a desired goal through effort, skill, and perseverance: to accomplish what one has hoped for. Achieve emphasizes accomplishing something important, excellent, or great: to achieve a major breakthrough.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for do away with (1 of 6)

do away with


verb (intr, adverb + preposition)

to kill or destroy
to discard or abolish

British Dictionary definitions for do away with (2 of 6)

Word Origin for away

Old English on weg on way

British Dictionary definitions for do away with (3 of 6)

DO


abbreviation for

Doctor of Optometry
Doctor of Osteopathy

British Dictionary definitions for do away with (4 of 6)

do

1
/ (duː, unstressed , ) /

verb does, doing, did or done

noun plural dos or do's

Word Origin for do

Old English dōn; related to Old Frisian duān, Old High German tuon, Latin abdere to put away, Greek tithenai to place; see deed, doom

British Dictionary definitions for do away with (5 of 6)

do

2
/ (dəʊ) /

noun plural dos

a variant spelling of doh 1

British Dictionary definitions for do away with (6 of 6)

do

3

the internet domain name for

Dominican Republic
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with do away with (1 of 2)

do away with


1

Make an end of, eliminate. For example, The town fathers have decided to do away with the old lighting system.

2

Demolish, destroy, kill, as in The animal officer did away with the injured deer lying by the side of the road. In the 13th century both usages were simply put as do away, the with being added only in the late 1700s.

Idioms and Phrases with do away with (2 of 2)

away


see back away; bang away; blow away; break away; by far (and away); carry away; cart off (away); cast away; clear out (away); die away; do away with; draw away; eat away; explain away; fade out (away); fall away; fire away; fool away; fritter away; get away; get away with; give away; go away; hammer away; lay aside (away); make away with; out and away; pass away; peg away at; piss away; plug away at; pull away; put away; right away; run away; run away with; salt away; send away; shy away from; slink away; slip out (away); sock away; spirit away; square away; squirrel away; stow away; take away from; take one's breath away; tear away; throw away; tuck away; turn away; walk away from; walk off (away) with; waste away; wear off (away); whale away; when the cat's away; while away.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.