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View synonyms for doctrine

doctrine

[ dok-trin ]

noun

  1. a particular principle, position, or policy taught or advocated, as of a religion or government:

    Catholic doctrines;

    the Monroe Doctrine.

    Synonyms: belief, precept, theory, dogma, tenet

  2. something that is taught; teachings collectively:

    religious doctrine.

  3. a body or system of teachings relating to a particular subject:

    the doctrine of the Catholic Church.



doctrine

/ ˌdɒktrɪˈnælɪtɪ; ˈdɒktrɪn; dɒkˈtraɪnəl /

noun

  1. a creed or body of teachings of a religious, political, or philosophical group presented for acceptance or belief; dogma
  2. a principle or body of principles that is taught or advocated


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Derived Forms

  • ˈdoctrinism, noun
  • docˈtrinally, adverb
  • doctrinality, noun
  • ˈdoctrinist, noun
  • doctrinal, adjective
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Other Words From

  • self-doctrine noun
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Word History and Origins

Origin of doctrine1

First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin doctrīna “teaching,” from doct(o)r doctor + -īna -ine 2
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Word History and Origins

Origin of doctrine1

C14: from Old French, from Latin doctrīna teaching, from doctor see doctor
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Example Sentences

For example, as David Rotman writes, the economic doctrine of high GDP growth, once challenged only by people on the radical fringe, is now being questioned by Nobel-winning economists.

Because it discourages consideration of the secondary impacts of a corporation’s actions, the doctrine is arguably at the root of phenomena, such as offshoring and contingent labor, which have frayed the social fabric of America and the world.

From Fortune

Under Kentucky’s version of the castle doctrine — a home-defense provision common in many states — residents are allowed to use defensive force against someone “forcibly entering” a dwelling.

I am very much an instrumentalist, and am comfortable with the “shut up and calculate” doctrine.

The doctrine of evolutionary ethics is now blessedly in decline, mostly because of a widespread feeling that science and morality represent, as Stephen Jay Gould argued, different and non-overlapping magisteria.

Most often, the doctrine is invoked by minors seeking an abortion without parental consent.

If it leads to real change, not just in tone, but also in doctrine and policy, it would indeed be an earthquake.

But Francis has also implied that his hands are tied when it comes to changing doctrine or altering church teachings.

Affleck, as if on cue, challenged Harris: “Are you the person who understands the officially codified doctrine of Islam?”

And he went on to give as much of a Rand Paul Middle East Doctrine as a place where doctrine is the problem can take.

The doctrine of international free trade, albeit the most conspicuous of its applications, was but one case under the general law.

“Doctrine”—the Monroe doctrine declared that no foreign power should acquire additional dominion in America.

But the central economic doctrine of cost can not be shaken by mere denunciation.

He forgot the great doctrine of humility, and declared that "Mister" Weston should have the volume that very night.

The biological doctrine of evolution was misinterpreted and misapplied to social policy.

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doctrinaldoctrine of descent