drake

1
[ dreyk ]
/ dreɪk /

noun

a male duck.Compare duck1 (def. 2).

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Origin of drake

1
1250–1300; Middle English; cognate with Low German drake,dialectal German drache; compare Old High German antrahho,anutrehho male duck

Definition for drake (2 of 3)

drake2
[ dreyk ]
/ dreɪk /

noun

a small cannon, used especially in the 17th and 18th centuries.
Archaic. a dragon.

Origin of drake

2
before 900; Middle English; Old English draca<Latin dracōdragon

Definition for drake (3 of 3)

Drake
[ dreyk ]
/ dreɪk /

noun

Sir Francis, c1540–96, English admiral and buccaneer: sailed around the world 1577–80.
Joseph Rod·man [rod-muhn], /ˈrɒd mən/, 1795–1820, U.S. poet.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for drake

British Dictionary definitions for drake (1 of 3)

drake1
/ (dreɪk) /

noun

the male of any duck

Word Origin for drake

C13: perhaps from Low German; compare Middle Dutch andrake, Old High German antrahho

British Dictionary definitions for drake (2 of 3)

drake2
/ (dreɪk) /

noun

angling an artificial fly resembling a mayfly
history a small cannon
an obsolete word for dragon

Word Origin for drake

Old English draca, ultimately from Latin dracō dragon

British Dictionary definitions for drake (3 of 3)

Drake
/ (dreɪk) /

noun

Sir Francis. ?1540–96, English navigator and buccaneer, the first Englishman to sail around the world (1577–80). He commanded a fleet against the Spanish Armada (1588) and contributed greatly to its defeat
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012