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dragon

[ drag-uhn ]
/ ˈdræg ən /
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See synonyms for: dragon / dragons on Thesaurus.com

noun
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Idioms about dragon

    chase the dragon, Slang. to inhale the vapor of heated heroin or another opiate drug.

Origin of dragon

First recorded in 1175–1225; Middle English, from Old French, from Latin dracōn- (stem of dracō ), from Greek drákōn the name of a kind of serpent, probably originally an epithet, “the (sharp-)sighted one,” akin to dérkesthai “to look”

OTHER WORDS FROM dragon

drag·on·ish, adjectivedrag·on·like, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use dragon in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for dragon

dragon
/ (ˈdræɡən) /

noun

Derived forms of dragon

dragoness, fem ndragonish, adjective

Word Origin for dragon

C13: from Old French, from Latin dracō, from Greek drakōn; related to drakos eye
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with dragon

drag on

Also, drag out. Prolong or be prolonged tediously. For example, The speech dragged on for another hour, or He dragged out the story in an excruciating manner. [First half of 1800s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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