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dreadnought

or dread·naught

[ dred-nawt ]
/ ˈdrɛdˌnɔt /
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noun

a type of battleship armed with heavy-caliber guns in turrets: so called from the British battleship Dreadnought, launched in 1906, the first of its type.
an outer garment of heavy woolen cloth.
a thick cloth with a long pile.

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Origin of dreadnought

First recorded in 1800–10; dread + nought
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for dreadnought

British Dictionary definitions for dreadnought

dreadnought

dreadnaught

/ (ˈdrɛdˌnɔːt) /

noun

a battleship armed with heavy guns of uniform calibre
an overcoat made of heavy cloth
slang a heavyweight boxer
a person who fears nothing
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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