driftage

[ drif-tij ]

noun
  1. the action or an amount of drifting.

  2. drifted matter.

  1. Navigation. the amount of drift away from a set course as a result of wind and currents.

Origin of driftage

1
First recorded in 1760–70; drift + -age

Words Nearby driftage

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2024

How to use driftage in a sentence

  • Fuel coal is also too pure to have been accumulated by driftage.

    The Elements of Geology | William Harmon Norton
  • No more man-wrought driftage came our way, but other signs multiplied.

    1492 | Mary Johnston
  • Experience has given directions for its use, avoiding some of the grosser causes of error from driftage and other causes.

    The Story of the Atlantic Telegraph | Henry M. (Henry Martyn) Field
  • Also they were scrubs—the dirty driftage of the fight game, without honor, without efficiency.

    The Night-Born | Jack London
  • Among the heaps of sea-weed there were sometimes small pieces of painted wood, bark, and other driftage.

British Dictionary definitions for driftage

driftage

/ (ˈdrɪftɪdʒ) /


noun
  1. the act of drifting

  2. matter carried along or deposited by drifting

  1. the amount by which an aircraft or vessel has drifted from its intended course

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012