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dromond

[ drom-uhnd, druhm- ]
/ ˈdrɒm ənd, ˈdrʌm- /
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noun

a large, fast-sailing ship of the Middle Ages.

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Also drom·on [drom-uhn, druhm-]. /ˈdrɒm ən, ˈdrʌm-/.

Origin of dromond

1300–50; Middle English dromund<Anglo-French dromund, dromo(u)n<Late Latin dromō, stem dromōn-<Greek drómōn swift ship, derivative of drómos a running
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021
  • The dromond, in war-time, was sometimes converted into a warship, by the addition of fighting-castles fore and aft.

    On the Spanish Main|John Masefield
  • Well I wot of all chapmen—and to-night weighs a dromond Sailing west away first, and then to the southlands.

  • The Venetian dromond was to other merchant-ships as the dromedary to other camels.

  • Of Thorstein Dromond's Arms, and what he deemed they might do.

    The Story of Grettir The Strong|Translated by Eirikr Magnusson and William Morris

British Dictionary definitions for dromond

dromond

dromon (ˈdrɒmən, ˈdrʌm-)

/ (ˈdrɒmənd, ˈdrʌm-) /

noun

a large swift sailing vessel of the 12th to 15th centuries
C13: from Anglo-French dromund, ultimately from Late Greek dromōn light swift ship, from dromos a running
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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