Dunbar

[duhn-bahr for 1; duhn-bahr for 2, 3]
noun
  1. Paul Laurence,1872–1906, U.S. poet.
  2. William,c1460–c1520, Scottish poet.
  3. a town in the Lothian region, in SE Scotland, at the mouth of the Firth of Forth: site of Cromwell's defeat of the Scots 1650.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for dunbar

Contemporary Examples of dunbar

Historical Examples of dunbar

  • I cut him nigh to the saddle-bow in a skirmish on the eve of Dunbar.

    Micah Clarke

    Arthur Conan Doyle

  • He spoke of the sudden faintness which had come over Mr. Dunbar.

    Henry Dunbar

    M. E. Braddon

  • Mr. Dunbar, the constable, and Mr. Balderby drove straight to the magistrate's house.

    Henry Dunbar

    M. E. Braddon

  • Mr. Dunbar flung himself into a low easy-chair, and took up a newspaper.

    Henry Dunbar

    M. E. Braddon

  • Mr. Dunbar retired to the apartment that had been prepared for him.

    Henry Dunbar

    M. E. Braddon


British Dictionary definitions for dunbar

Dunbar

1
noun
  1. a port and resort in SE Scotland, in East Lothian: scene of Cromwell's defeat of the Scots (1650). Pop: 6354 (2001)

Dunbar

2
noun
  1. William. ?1460–?1520, Scottish poet, noted for his satirical, allegorical, and elegiac works
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012