durst

[ durst ]
/ dɜrst /
||

verb

Archaic. simple past tense of dare.

Nearby words

  1. durrell,
  2. durrell, lawrence,
  3. durrie,
  4. durry,
  5. durrës,
  6. duruflé,
  7. durum,
  8. durum wheat,
  9. duryea,
  10. durzi

Origin of dare

before 900; Middle English dar (v.), Old English dear(r), 1st and 3rd person singular present indicative of durran; akin to Old High German gitarran

SYNONYMS FOR dare
Related formsdar·er, nounre·dare, verb (used with object), re·dared, re·dar·ing.un·dared, adjective

Synonym study

1. Dare, venture imply involvement in risks and dangers. Dare emphasizes the state of mind that makes one willing to meet danger: He dared to do what he knew was right. Venture emphasizes the act of doing something that involves risk: He ventured into deep water.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for durst


British Dictionary definitions for durst

durst

/ (dɜːst) /

verb

a past tense of dare

dare

/ (dɛə) /

verb

(tr) to challenge (a person to do something) as proof of courage
(can take an infinitive with or without to) to be courageous enough to try (to do something)she dares to dress differently from the others; you wouldn't dare!
(tr) rare to oppose without fear; defy
I dare say or I daresay
  1. (it is) quite possible (that)
  2. probably: used as sentence substitute

noun

a challenge to do something as proof of courage
something done in response to such a challenge
Derived Formsdarer, noun

Word Origin for dare

Old English durran; related to Old High German turran to venture

usage

When used negatively or interrogatively, dare does not usually add -s: he dare not come; dare she come? When used negatively in the past tense, however, dare usually adds -d: he dared not come

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for durst
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper