dust

[ duhst ]
/ dʌst /

noun

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

Idioms for dust

Origin of dust

before 900; Middle English; Old English dūst; cognate with German Dunst vapor

OTHER WORDS FROM dust

dust·less, adjectivere·dust, verb (used with object)un·dust·ed, adjectivewell-dust·ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for dust off

dust
/ (dʌst) /

noun

verb

See also dust down, dust-up

Derived forms of dust

dustless, adjective

Word Origin for dust

Old English dūst; related to Danish dyst flour dust, Middle Dutch dūst dust, meal dust, Old High German tunst storm
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with dust off (1 of 2)

dust off

1

Restore to use. For example, I've dusted off last year's menu for the party. This usage alludes to cleaning and thereby renewing some object. [Mid-1900s]

2

Pitch a baseball dangerously close to the batter's head, as in I'm sure he dusted him off on purpose. [Slang; 1920s]

3

Finish off, kill; also, easily defeat. For example, They vowed to dust off the old man, or We'll dust off this team in no time. [Slang; c. 1940]

4

Thrash, beat up, as in If he didn't hand over his wallet, they threatened to dust him off. [Slang; 1920s]

Idioms and Phrases with dust off (2 of 2)

dust

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.