butcher

[ booch-er ]
/ ˈbʊtʃ ər /

noun

a retail or wholesale dealer in meat.
a person who slaughters certain animals, or who dresses the flesh of animals, fish, or poultry, for food or market.
a person guilty of brutal or indiscriminate slaughter or murder.
a vendor who hawks newspapers, candy, beverages, etc., as on a train, at a stadium, etc.

verb (used with object)

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Origin of butcher

First recorded in 1250–1300; Middle English bocher, from Anglo-French; Old French bo(u)chier, equivalent to bo(u)c “he-goat” (from unattested Gaulish bucco-; compare Old Irish boc,Welsh bwch; akin to buck1) + -ier-ier2 (see -er2)

synonym study for butcher

5, 6. See slaughter.

OTHER WORDS FROM butcher

butch·er·er, nounun·butch·ered, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for butcher

British Dictionary definitions for butcher

butcher
/ (ˈbʊtʃə) /

noun

a retailer of meat
a person who slaughters or dresses meat for market
an indiscriminate or brutal murderer
a person who destroys, ruins, or bungles something

verb (tr)

Word Origin for butcher

C13: from Old French bouchier, from bouc he-goat, probably of Celtic origin; see buck 1; compare Welsh bwch he-goat
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012