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dux

[ duhks, dooks ]

noun

, plural du·ces [doo, -seez, dyoo, -, doo, -keys], dux·es [duhk, -siz, dook, -].
  1. British. the pupil who is academically first in a class or school.
  2. (in the later Roman Empire) a military chief commanding the troops in a frontier province.


dux

/ dʌks /

noun

  1. (in Scottish and certain other schools) the top pupil in a class or school


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Word History and Origins

Origin of dux1

1800–10; < Latin: literally, leader, noun derivative from base of dūcere to lead

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Word History and Origins

Origin of dux1

Latin: leader

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Example Sentences

At last the teacher asked where Sheffield was, and was answered; it was then pointed to by the dux, as a dot on a skeleton map.

Nullus eum prohibeat, non rex, non dux, nec ulla persona habeat potestatem prohibendi ei.

He accepted, and for the fourteen remaining years of his life lived at Dux, where he wrote his Memoirs.

My progress at school was so rapid during four or five months that the master promoted me to the rank of dux.

"Harry's, when you were made dux," whispered Ethel to her brother.

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DuwamishDuxbury