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dys-

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a combining form meaning “ill,” “bad,” used in the formation of compound words: dysfunction.
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Origin of dys-

<Greek; cognate with Old Norse tor-,German zer-,Sanskrit dus-
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use dys- in a sentence

  • Mother died of dys—what do you call it—in the hot weather, and Father and two of the young ones have just got back.

    Jude the Obscure|Thomas Hardy
  • Ho someuer desyreth to be a good Oratour or to dys- pute and commune of any maner thynge / hym beho- ueth to haue foure thinges.

  • After a few uncertain "J-u-u-dys," he trudged on again in silence.

    A Son of the City|Herman Gastrell Seely

British Dictionary definitions for dys-

dys-

prefix
diseased, abnormal, or faultydysentery; dyslexia
difficult or painfuldysuria
unfavourable or baddyslogistic

Word Origin for dys-

via Latin from Greek dus-
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for dys-

dys-

pref.
Abnormal:dysplasia.
Impaired:dysesthesia.
Difficult:dysphonia.
Bad:dyspepsia.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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