echo

[ ek-oh ]
/ ˈɛk oʊ /

noun, plural ech·oes.

verb (used without object), ech·oed, ech·o·ing.

to emit an echo; resound with an echo: The hall echoed with cheers.
to be repeated by or as by an echo: Shouts echoed through the street.

verb (used with object), ech·oed, ech·o·ing.

QUIZZES

THE OCTOBER WORD OF THE DAY QUIZ IS HERE TO HAUNT YOU

Search your capacious memory for the meaning of October’s words!
Question 1 of 9
Which Word of the Day from this month means, “an irrational dislike; loathing”?

Origin of echo

1300–50; Middle English ecco<Latin ēchō<Greek, akin to ēchḗ sound

OTHER WORDS FROM echo

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for echo (1 of 4)

echo
/ (ˈɛkəʊ) /

noun plural -oes

verb -oes, -oing or -oed

Derived forms of echo

echoing, adjectiveecholess, adjectiveecho-like, adjective

Word Origin for echo

C14: via Latin from Greek ēkhō; related to Greek ēkhē sound

British Dictionary definitions for echo (2 of 4)

Echo1
/ (ˈɛkəʊ) /

noun

either of two US passive communications satellites, the first of which was launched in 1960

British Dictionary definitions for echo (3 of 4)

Echo2
/ (ˈɛkəʊ) /

noun

Greek myth a nymph who, spurned by Narcissus, pined away until only her voice remained

British Dictionary definitions for echo (4 of 4)

Echo3
/ (ˈɛkəʊ) /

noun

communications code word for the letter e
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for echo

echo
[ ĕkō ]

A repeated sound that is caused by the reflection of sound waves from a surface. The sound is heard more than once because of the time difference between the initial production of the sound waves and their return from the reflecting surface.
A wave that carries a signal and is reflected. Echoes of radio signals (carried by electromagnetic waves) are used in radar to detect the location or velocity of distant objects.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.