QUIZZES

LEARN THE SPANISH WORDS FOR THESE COMMON ANIMALS!

Are you learning Spanish? Or do you just have an interest in foreign languages? Either way, this quiz on Spanish words for animals is for you.
Question 1 of 13
How do you say “cat” 🐈 in Spanish?

Idioms for chase

    cut to the chase, Informal. to get to the main point.

Origin of chase

1
First recorded in 1250–1300; Middle English chacen, chacien, from Middle French chasser “to hunt,” Old French chacier, from unattested Vulgar Latin captiāre; see catch

OTHER WORDS FROM chase

chase·a·ble, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH chase

chased , chaste

Definition for chase (2 of 4)

chase2
[ cheys ]
/ tʃeɪs /

noun

a rectangular iron frame in which composed type is secured or locked for printing or platemaking.
Building Trades. a space or groove in a masonry wall or through a floor for pipes or ducts.
a groove, furrow, or trench; a lengthened hollow.
Ordnance.
  1. the part of a gun in front of the trunnions.
  2. the part containing the bore.

Origin of chase

2
First recorded in 1570–80; from Middle French chas, chasse, from Late Latin capsus (masculine), capsum (neuter) “fully or partly enclosed space,” variant of capsa case2

Definition for chase (3 of 4)

chase3
[ cheys ]
/ tʃeɪs /

verb (used with object), chased, chas·ing.

to ornament (metal) by engraving or embossing.
to cut (a screw thread), as with a chaser or machine tool.

Origin of chase

3
First recorded in 1400–50; late Middle English chased (past participle); shortened variant of enchase

Definition for chase (4 of 4)

Chase
[ cheys ]
/ tʃeɪs /

noun

Mary Ellen, 1887–1973, U.S. educator, novelist, and essayist.
Sal·mon Portland [sal-muhn], /ˈsæl mən/, 1808–73, U.S. jurist and statesman: secretary of the treasury 1861–64; chief justice of the U.S. 1864–73.
Samuel, 1741–1811, U.S. jurist and leader in the American Revolution: associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court 1796–1811.
Stuart, 1888–1985, U.S. economist and writer.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for chase

British Dictionary definitions for chase (1 of 3)

chase1
/ (tʃeɪs) /

verb

noun

Derived forms of chase

chaseable, adjective

Word Origin for chase

C13: from Old French chacier, from Vulgar Latin captiāre (unattested), from Latin captāre to pursue eagerly, from capere to take; see catch

British Dictionary definitions for chase (2 of 3)

chase2
/ (tʃeɪs) /

noun

printing a rectangular steel or cast-iron frame into which metal type and blocks making up pages are locked for printing or plate-making
the part of a gun barrel from the front of the trunnions to the muzzle
a groove or channel, esp one that is cut in a wall to take a pipe, cable, etc

verb (tr)

Also: chamfer to cut a groove, furrow, or flute in (a surface, column, etc)

Word Origin for chase

C17 (in the sense: frame for letterpress matter): probably from French châsse frame (in the sense: bore of a cannon, etc): from Old French chas enclosure, from Late Latin capsus pen for animals; both from Latin capsa case ²

British Dictionary definitions for chase (3 of 3)

chase3
/ (tʃeɪs) /

verb (tr)

Also: enchase to ornament (metal) by engraving or embossing
to form or finish (a screw thread) with a chaser

Word Origin for chase

C14: from Old French enchasser enchase
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with chase

chase

see ambulance chaser; cut to the chase; give chase; go fly a kite (chase yourself); lead a merry chase; run (chase) after; wild goose chase.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.