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chaser

1
[chey-ser]
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noun
  1. a person or thing that chases or pursues.
  2. a drink of a milder beverage taken after a drink of liquor.
  3. Also called chase gun. (on a vessel) a gun especially for use when in chase or when being chased.
  4. a hunter.
  5. Theater.
    1. Chiefly British.the final act or musical number of a vaudeville or variety show.
    2. the music played as the audience leaves a theater.
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Origin of chaser

1
Middle English word dating back to 1250–1300; see origin at chase1, -er1

chaser

2
[chey-ser]
noun
  1. a tool with multiple teeth for cutting screw threads.
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Origin of chaser

2
First recorded in 1700–10; chase2 + -er1

chaser

3
[chey-ser]
noun
  1. a person who engraves metal.
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Origin of chaser

3
First recorded in 1700–10; chase3 + -er1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for chaser

performance, attitude, show, denouement, climax, conclusion, juice, broth, vapor, defender, warden, escort, gallant, flirt, debaucher, lover, operator, cruiser, swinger, chaser

Examples from the Web for chaser

Contemporary Examples of chaser

Historical Examples of chaser


British Dictionary definitions for chaser

chaser

1
noun
  1. a person or thing that chases
  2. a drink drunk after another of a different kind, as beer after spirits
  3. a cannon on a vessel situated either at the bow (bow chaser) or the stern (stern chaser) and used during pursuit by or of another vessel
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chaser

2
noun
  1. a person who engraves
  2. a lathe cutting tool for accurately finishing a screw thread, having a cutting edge consisting of several repetitions of the thread form
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for chaser

n.

c.1300, "horse trained for chasing," agent noun from chase (v.), probably in some cases from Old French chaceor "huntsman, hunter." Meaning "water or mild beverage taken after a strong drink" is 1897, U.S. colloquial. French had chasse (from chasser "to chase") "a drink of liquor taken (or said to be taken) to kill the aftertaste of coffee or tobacco," used in English from c.1800.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper