educt

[ ee-duhkt ]
/ ˈi dʌkt /

noun

something educed; eduction.
Chemistry. a substance extracted from a mixture, as distinguished from a product.

QUIZZES

DO YOU KNOW THIS VOCABULARY FROM "THE HANDMAID'S TALE"?

"The Handmaid's Tale" was required reading for many of us in school. Everyone else has probably watched the very popular and addictive TV show. Do you remember this vocabulary from the book, and do you know what these terms mean?
Question 1 of 10
decorum

Origin of educt

1790–1800; < Latin ēductum something educed, noun use of neuter of ēductus educed (past participle of ēdūcere to educe), equivalent to ē- e-1 + -duc- lead + -tus past participle suffix
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for educt

  • It regards every organised being as generated by one of like kind, either as an educt or a product.

  • To sum up, it seems to the writer that the poison of loco is a product, and not an educt.

  • Still, such ethnology as this supplies is an educt from the works in question, rather than their subject.

    Man and His Migrations|R. G. (Robert Gordon) Latham

British Dictionary definitions for educt

educt
/ (ˈiːdʌkt) /

noun

a substance separated from another substance without chemical changeCompare product (def. 4)

Word Origin for educt

C18: from Latin ēductus; see educe
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012