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eerie

or ee·ry

[ eer-ee ]
/ ˈɪər i /
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See synonyms for: eerie / eerily on Thesaurus.com

adjective, ee·ri·er, ee·ri·est.

uncanny, so as to inspire superstitious fear; weird an eerie midnight howl.
Chiefly Scot. affected with superstitious fear.

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Origin of eerie

First recorded in 1250–1300; Middle English eri, dialectal variant of argh, Old English earg “cowardly”; cognate with Old Frisian erg, Old Norse argr “evil,” German arg “cowardly”
1. See weird.
ee·ri·ly, adverbee·ri·ness, noun
aerie, eerie
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for eerie

eerie
/ (ˈɪərɪ) /

adjective eerier or eeriest

(esp of places, an atmosphere, etc) mysteriously or uncannily frightening or disturbing; weird; ghostly
eerily, adverbeeriness, noun
C13: originally Scottish and Northern English, probably from Old English earg cowardly, miserable
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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