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eisteddfod

[ahy-steth-vod, ey-steth-]
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noun, plural eis·tedd·fods, eis·tedd·fod·au [ey-steth-vod-ahy, ahy-steth-] /ˌeɪ stɛðˈvɒd aɪ, ˌaɪ stɛð-/.
  1. (in Wales) an annual festival, with competitions among poets and musicians.
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Origin of eisteddfod

1815–25; < Welsh: literally, session, equivalent to eistedd sitting + fod, variant (by lenition) of bod being
Related formseis·tedd·fod·ic, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for eisteddfod

Historical Examples

  • I suppose by graduate bard you mean one who has gained the chair at an eisteddfod?

    Wild Wales

    George Borrow

  • Then don't you remember the girl who played a solo for Templeton at the Eisteddfod?

  • Finally, eight other preachers from the eisteddfod came and announced to the Elder their intention.

  • The Eisteddfod found in him a thorough friend and a wise counsellor.

  • It does not matter much whether you can bring yourself to believe in the Eisteddfod or not.

    Res Judicat

    Augustine Birrell


British Dictionary definitions for eisteddfod

eisteddfod

noun plural -fods or -fodau (Welsh aɪˌstɛðˈvɒdaɪ)
  1. any of a number of annual festivals in Wales, esp the Royal National Eisteddfod, in which competitions are held in music, poetry, drama, and the fine arts
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Derived Formseisteddfodic, adjective

Word Origin

C19: from Welsh, literally: session, from eistedd to sit (from sedd seat) + -fod, from bod to be
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for eisteddfod

Eisteddfod

n.

"annual assembly of Welsh bards," 1822, from Welsh, literally "session," from eistedd "to sit" (from sedd "seat," cognate with Latin sedere; see sedentary) + bod "to be" (cognate with Old English beon; see be).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper