either-or

[ ee-ther-awr, ahy-ther- ]
/ ˈi ðərˈɔr, ˈaɪ ðər- /

adjective

allowing no equivocation; being limited in choice to two options: It's an either-or situation—you pay the bill or you lose the company's services.

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Origin of either-or

First recorded in 1925–30
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for either-or

  • The dream never utters the alternative "either-or," but accepts both as having equal rights in the same connection.

    Dream Psychology|Sigmund Freud
  • An "either-or" more terrible no doubt than the one he had formulated before her just a year ago.

    The Elusive Pimpernel|Baroness Emmuska Orczy
  • When "either-or" is used in the reproduction of dreams, it is, as I have already mentioned, to be replaced by "and."

    Dream Psychology|Sigmund Freud

British Dictionary definitions for either-or

either-or

adjective

presenting an unavoidable need to choose between two alternativesan either-or situation
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012