electrum

[ ih-lek-truhm ]

noun
  1. an amber-colored alloy of gold and silver used in ancient times.

  2. an alloy composed of about 50 percent copper, 30 percent nickel, and 20 percent zinc.

  1. German silver; nickel silver.

Origin of electrum

1
1350–1400; Middle English <Latin <Greek ḗlektron amber, alloy of gold and silver

Words Nearby electrum

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use electrum in a sentence

  • The Lydians began coinage by stamping with a punch each ingot or nugget of gold or silver, or a mixture of them called “electrum.”

    The Swastika | Thomas Wilson
  • On her finger she wore a little ring made of a kind of brass, sometimes called electrum.

  • The ornaments represented in the drawings are of pure gold, or electrum, or silver, or copper.

    Troy and its Remains | Henry (Heinrich) Schliemann
  • The most ancient Lydian coins are likewise made of electrum.

    Troy and its Remains | Henry (Heinrich) Schliemann
  • Another ore of gold is the alloy with silver, or argental gold, the electrum of Pliny, so called from its amber shade.

British Dictionary definitions for electrum

electrum

/ (ɪˈlɛktrəm) /


noun
  1. an alloy of gold (55–88 per cent) and silver used for jewellery and ornaments

Origin of electrum

1
C14: from Latin, from Greek ēlektron amber

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012