elegy

[ el-i-jee ]
/ ˈɛl ɪ dʒi /

noun, plural el·e·gies.

a mournful, melancholy, or plaintive poem, especially a funeral song or a lament for the dead.
a poem written in elegiac meter.
a sad or mournful musical composition.

QUIZZES

DO YOU KNOW THIS VOCABULARY FROM "THE HANDMAID'S TALE"?

"The Handmaid's Tale" was required reading for many of us in school. Everyone else has probably watched the very popular and addictive TV show. Do you remember this vocabulary from the book, and do you know what these terms mean?
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decorum

Origin of elegy

1505–15; (< Middle French) < Latin elegīa < Greek elegeía, orig. neuter plural of elegeîos elegiac, equivalent to éleg(os) a lament + -eios adj. suffix

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH elegy

elegy eulogy
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for elegy

British Dictionary definitions for elegy

elegy
/ (ˈɛlɪdʒɪ) /

noun plural -gies

a mournful or plaintive poem or song, esp a lament for the dead
poetry or a poem written in elegiac couplets or stanzas

Word Origin for elegy

C16: via French and Latin from Greek elegeia, from elegos lament sung to flute accompaniment

undefined elegy

Avoid confusion with eulogy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Cultural definitions for elegy

elegy
[ (el-uh-jee) ]

A form of poetry that mourns the loss of someone who has died or something that has deteriorated. A notable example is the “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard,” by Thomas Gray. (Compare eulogy.)

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.