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elicit

[ ih-lis-it ]
/ ɪˈlɪs ɪt /
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See synonyms for: elicit / elicited / eliciting / elicits on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object)
to draw or bring out or forth; educe; evoke: to elicit the truth; to elicit a response with a question.
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Origin of elicit

First recorded in 1635–45; from Latin ēlicitus “drawn out” (past participle of ēlicere ), equivalent to ē- “from, out of” (see e-1) + lici- “draw, lure” + -tus past participle suffix

OTHER WORDS FROM elicit

e·lic·i·ta·tion [ih-lis-i-tey-shuhn] /ɪˌlɪs ɪˈteɪ ʃən/ noune·lic·i·tor, nounnon·e·lic·it·ed, adjectiveun·e·lic·it·ed, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH elicit

elicit , illicit
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use elicit in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for elicit

elicit
/ (ɪˈlɪsɪt) /

verb (tr)
to give rise to; evoketo elicit a sharp retort
to bring to lightto elicit the truth

Derived forms of elicit

elicitable, adjectiveelicitation, nounelicitor, noun

Word Origin for elicit

C17: from Latin ēlicere to lure forth, from licere to entice
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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