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elite

or é·lite

[ ih-leet, ey-leet ]
/ ɪˈlit, eɪˈlit /
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See synonyms for: elite / elites on Thesaurus.com

noun
(often used with a plural verb) the choice or best of anything considered collectively, as of a group or class of persons.
(used with a plural verb) persons of the highest class:Only the elite were there.
a group of persons exercising the major share of authority or influence within a larger group: the power elite of a major political party.
a type, approximately 10-point in printing-type size, widely used in typewriters and having 12 characters to the inch.Compare pica1.
adjective
representing the most choice or select; best: an elite group of authors.
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Origin of elite

First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English elit “a person elected to office,” from Middle French e(s)lit, past participle of e(s)lire “to choose”; see elect

OTHER WORDS FROM elite

an·ti·e·lite, noun, adjectivenon·e·lite, nounsu·per·e·lite, noun

Words nearby elite

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use elite in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for elite

elite

lite

/ (ɪˈliːt, eɪ-) /

noun
(sometimes functioning as plural) the most powerful, rich, gifted, or educated members of a group, community, etc
Also called: twelve pitch a typewriter typesize having 12 characters to the inch
adjective
of, relating to, or suitable for an elite; exclusive

Word Origin for elite

C18: from French, from Old French eslit chosen, from eslire to choose, from Latin ēligere to elect
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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