embody

[em-bod-ee]
See more synonyms for embody on Thesaurus.com
verb (used with object), em·bod·ied, em·bod·y·ing.
  1. to give a concrete form to; express, personify, or exemplify in concrete form: to embody an idea in an allegorical painting.
  2. to provide with a body; incarnate; make corporeal: to embody a spirit.
  3. to collect into or include in a body; organize; incorporate.
  4. to embrace or comprise.
Also imbody.

Origin of embody

First recorded in 1540–50; em-1 + body
Related formsem·bod·i·er, nounpre·em·bod·y, verb (used with object), pre·em·bod·ied, pre·em·bod·y·ing.re·em·bod·y, verb (used with object), re·em·bod·ied, re·em·bod·y·ing.well-em·bod·ied, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for embody

Contemporary Examples of embody

Historical Examples of embody

  • At last in desperation you embody it in a poem, an essay, a story.

    Ballads of a Bohemian

    Robert W. Service

  • I had for some time thought about it, but had not attempted to embody the conception in a drawing.

    Self-Help

    Samuel Smiles

  • Yet the English have contrived to embody all these in one word, and that word my name!'

    Lord Kilgobbin

    Charles Lever

  • Endeavor to embody in the laws of the community the spirit of equity and progress.

  • We may read this cable wrong but it seems to us to embody a topsy-turvy tactic!


British Dictionary definitions for embody

embody

verb -bodies, -bodying or -bodied (tr)
  1. to give a tangible, bodily, or concrete form to (an abstract concept)
  2. to be an example of or express (an idea, principle, etc), esp in actionhis gentleness embodies a Christian ideal
  3. (often foll by in) to collect or unite in a comprehensive whole, system, etc; comprise; includeall the different essays were embodied in one long article
  4. to invest (a spiritual entity) with a body or with bodily form; render incarnate
Derived Formsembodiment, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for embody
v.

1540s, in reference to a soul or spirit invested with a physical form; of principles, ideas, etc., from 1660s; from en- (1) "in" + body. Related: Embodied; embodying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper