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empire

[ em-pahyuhr; for 8-10 also om-peer ]
/ ˈɛm paɪər; for 8-10 also ɒmˈpɪər /
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noun
adjective
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Origin of empire

1250–1300; Middle English <Anglo-French, Old French <Latin imperium;see empery

OTHER WORDS FROM empire

in·ter·em·pire, adjectivepre-Empire, adjectivepro·em·pire, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH empire

empire , umpire
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use empire in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for empire (1 of 2)

empire
/ (ˈɛmpaɪə) /

noun
an aggregate of peoples and territories, often of great extent, under the rule of a single person, oligarchy, or sovereign state
any monarchy that for reasons of history, prestige, etc, has an emperor rather than a king as head of state
the period during which a particular empire exists
supreme power; sovereignty
a large industrial organization with many ramifications, esp a multinational corporation

Other words from empire

Related adjective: imperial

Word Origin for empire

C13: from Old French, from Latin imperium rule, from imperāre to command, from parāre to prepare

British Dictionary definitions for empire (2 of 2)

Empire
/ (ˈɛmpaɪə) /

noun the Empire
French history
  1. the period of imperial rule in France from 1804 to 1815 under Napoleon Bonaparte
  2. Also called: Second Empire the period from 1852 to 1870 when Napoleon III ruled as emperor
adjective
denoting, characteristic of, or relating to the British Empire
denoting, characteristic of, or relating to either French Empire, esp the first: in particular, denoting the neoclassical style of architecture and furniture and the high-waisted style of women's dresses characteristic of the period
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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