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emplace

[ em-pleys ]
/ ɛmˈpleɪs /
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verb (used with object), em·placed, em·plac·ing.
to put in place or position: A statue was emplaced in the square.
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Origin of emplace

First recorded in 1860–65; back formation from emplacement
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use emplace in a sentence

  • The troublesome Austrian battery was put so completely out of action that the enemy never thought it worth while to re-emplace it.

    Many Fronts|Lewis R. Freeman
  • They're going to emplace that gun somewhere up on the hill-side, and pepper our people on their way back.'

    On Land And Sea At The Dardanelles|Thomas Charles Bridges
  • The male employs weaving, twisting, and pecking motions of the head to emplace material.

  • It is impossible to mark out the enceinte of the ancient town, or indeed to emplace it with any exactitude.

    History of Phoenicia|George Rawlinson

British Dictionary definitions for emplace

emplace
/ (ɪmˈpleɪs) /

verb
(tr) to put in place or position
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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