enjambment

[ en-jam-muhnt, -jamb- ]
/ ɛnˈdʒæm mənt, -ˈdʒæmb- /

noun, plural en·jamb·ments [en-jam-muhnts, -jamb-]. /ɛnˈdʒæm mənts, -ˈdʒæmb-/. Prosody.

the running on of the thought from one line, couplet, or stanza to the next without a syntactical break: Enjambment is a creative device of long standing, famously used by Homer, Shakespeare, and Eliot, among many other literary luminaries.

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Origin of enjambment

First recorded in 1830–40; from French enjambement, equivalent to enjamb(er) “to stride over, project, encroach” (en- + -jamber, derivative of jambe “leg” + -ment ); see origin at en-1, jamb1,-ment

OTHER WORDS FROM enjambment

en·jambed, adjective

Words nearby enjambment

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for enjambment

British Dictionary definitions for enjambment

enjambment

enjambement

/ (ɪnˈdʒæmmənt, French ɑ̃ʒɑ̃bmɑ̃) /

noun

prosody the running over of a sentence from one line of verse into the next

Derived forms of enjambment

enjambed, adjective

Word Origin for enjambment

C19: from French, literally: a straddling, from enjamber to straddle, from en- 1 + jambe leg; see jamb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012