entitle

[ en-tahyt-l ]
/ ɛnˈtaɪt l /

verb (used with object), en·ti·tled, en·ti·tling.

to give (a person or thing) a title, right, or claim to something; furnish with grounds for laying claim: His executive position entitled him to certain courtesies rarely accorded others.
to call by a particular title or name: What was the book entitled?
to designate (a person) by an honorary title.
Also intitle.

Origin of entitle

1350–1400; Middle English entitlen < Anglo-French entitler, variant of Middle French entituler < Late Latin intitulāre. See en-1, title

Related forms

pre·en·ti·tle, verb (used with object), pre·en·ti·tled, pre·en·ti·tling.sub·en·ti·tle, verb (used with object), sub·en·ti·tled, sub·en·ti·tling.un·en·ti·tled, adjectivewell-en·ti·tled, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for entitle

British Dictionary definitions for entitle

entitle

/ (ɪnˈtaɪtəl) /

verb (tr)

to give (a person) the right to do or have something; qualify; allow
to give a name or title to
to confer a title of rank or honour upon

Derived Forms

entitlement, noun

Word Origin for entitle

C14: from Old French entituler, from Late Latin intitulāre, from Latin titulus title
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012