entreat

[ en-treet ]
/ ɛnˈtrit /

verb (used with object)

to ask (a person) earnestly; beseech; implore; beg: to entreat the judge for mercy.
to ask earnestly for (something): He entreated help in his work.

verb (used without object)

to make an earnest request or petition.

Nearby words

  1. entrapment neuropathy,
  2. entre nous,
  3. entre-,
  4. entre-deux-mers,
  5. entreasure,
  6. entreaty,
  7. entrechat,
  8. entrecôte,
  9. entree,
  10. entrelac

Origin of entreat

1300–50; Middle English entreten < Middle French entrait(i)er. See en-1, treat

Related forms

Synonym study

1. See appeal.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for entreat


British Dictionary definitions for entreat

entreat

intreat

/ (ɪnˈtriːt) /

verb

to ask (a person) earnestly; beg or plead with; implore
to make an earnest request or petition for (something)
an archaic word for treat (def. 4)
Derived Formsentreatingly or intreatingly, adverbentreatment or intreatment, noun

Word Origin for entreat

C15: from Old French entraiter, from en- 1 + traiter to treat

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for entreat

entreat

v.

mid-14c., "to enter into negotiations;" early 15c., "to treat (someone) in a certain way," also "to plead for (someone)," from Anglo-French entretier, Old French entraiter "to treat," from en- "make" (see en- (1)) + traiter "to treat" (see treat (v.)). Meaning "to beseech, implore" is first attested c.1500. Related: Entreated; entreating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper