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ephemeral

[ ih-fem-er-uhl ]
/ ɪˈfɛm ər əl /
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adjective
lasting a very short time; short-lived; transitory: the ephemeral joys of childhood.
lasting but one day: an ephemeral flower.
being of temporary value or passing interest: ephemeral news clips about forgotten but overhyped crises.
noun
anything short-lived, as certain insects.
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Origin of ephemeral

First recorded in 1570–80; from Greek ephḗmer(os) “short-lived, lasting but a day,” equivalent to ep-, variant of the preposition and prefix epí, epi- “on; over; near; before” + hēmér(a) “day” + -os adjective suffix + -al adjective suffix; see ep-, -al1

OTHER WORDS FROM ephemeral

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use ephemeral in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for ephemeral

ephemeral
/ (ɪˈfɛmərəl) /

adjective
lasting for only a short time; transitory; short-livedephemeral pleasure
noun
a short-lived organism, such as the mayfly
a plant that completes its life cycle in less than one year, usually less than six months

Derived forms of ephemeral

ephemerally, adverbephemerality or ephemeralness, noun

Word Origin for ephemeral

C16: from Greek ephēmeros lasting only a day, from hēmera day
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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