Epicureanism

[ ep-i-kyoo-ree-uh-niz-uhm, -kyoor-ee- ]
/ ˌɛp ɪ kyʊˈri əˌnɪz əm, -ˈkyʊər i- /

noun

the philosophical system or doctrine of Epicurus, holding that the external world is a series of fortuitous combinations of atoms and that the highest good is pleasure, interpreted as freedom from disturbance or pain.
(lowercase) epicurean indulgence or habits.

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seclusion
Also Ep·i·cur·ism [ep-i-kyoo-riz-uhm, ep-i-kyoor-iz-uhm]. /ˈɛp ɪ kyʊˌrɪz əm, ˌɛp ɪˈkyʊər ɪz əm/.

Origin of Epicureanism

First recorded in 1745–55; epicurean + -ism
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for Epicureanism

Cultural definitions for Epicureanism

Epicureanism
[ (ep-i-kyoo-ree-uh-niz-uhm, ep-i-kyoor-ee-uh-niz-uhm) ]

A form of hedonism defended by several philosophers of ancient Greece. For the Epicureans, the proper goal of action was pleasure — a long-term pleasure, marked by serenity and temperance.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.