epode

[ ep-ohd ]
/ ˈɛp oʊd /

noun

Classical Prosody. a kind of lyric poem, invented by Archilochus, in which a long verse is followed by a short one.
the part of a lyric ode following the strophe and antistrophe and composing with them a triadic unit.

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Origin of epode

1590–1600; <Latin epōdos<Greek epōidós an aftersong, singing after. See ep-, ode
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for epode

British Dictionary definitions for epode

epode
/ (ˈɛpəʊd) /

noun Greek prosody

the part of a lyric ode that follows the strophe and the antistrophe
a type of lyric poem composed of couplets in which a long line is followed by a shorter one, invented by Archilochus

Word Origin for epode

C16: via Latin from Greek epōidos a singing after, from epaidein to sing after, from aidein to sing
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012