euphuism

[ yoo-fyoo-iz-uh m ]
/ ˈyu fyuˌɪz əm /

noun

an affected style in imitation of that of Lyly, fashionable in England about the end of the 16th century, characterized chiefly by long series of antitheses and frequent similes relating to mythological natural history, and alliteration.Compare Euphues.
any similar ornate style of writing or speaking; high-flown, periphrastic language.

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decorum

Origin of euphuism

First recorded in 1590–1600; Euphu(es) + -ism

OTHER WORDS FROM euphuism

eu·phu·ist, nouneu·phu·is·tic, eu·phu·is·ti·cal, adjectiveeu·phu·is·ti·cal·ly, adverb

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH euphuism

euphemism euphuism
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for euphuism

British Dictionary definitions for euphuism

euphuism
/ (ˈjuːfjuːˌɪzəm) /

noun

an artificial prose style of the Elizabethan period, marked by extreme use of antithesis, alliteration, and extended similes and allusions
any stylish affectation in speech or writing, esp a rhetorical device or expression

Derived forms of euphuism

euphuist, nouneuphuistic or euphuistical, adjectiveeuphuistically, adverb

Word Origin for euphuism

C16: after Euphues, prose romance by John Lyly
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012