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excess

[ noun ik-ses, ek-ses; adjective, verb ek-ses, ik-ses ]
/ noun ɪkˈsɛs, ˈɛk sɛs; adjective, verb ˈɛk sɛs, ɪkˈsɛs /
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See synonyms for: excess / excessed / excesses / excessing on Thesaurus.com

noun
adjective
more than or above what is necessary, usual, or specified; extra: a charge for excess baggage; excess profits.
verb (used with object)
to dismiss, demote, transfer, or furlough (an employee), especially as part of a mass layoff.
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Origin of excess

1350–1400; Middle English (noun and adj.) <Latin excessus departure, digression, equivalent to exced-, variant stem of excēdere to exceed + -tus suffix of v. action

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH excess

access, assess, excess
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use excess in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for excess

excess

noun (ɪkˈsɛs, ˈɛksɛs)
adjective (ˈɛksɛs, ɪkˈsɛs) (usually prenominal)
more than normal, necessary, or permitted; surplusexcess weight
payable as a result of previous underpaymentexcess postage; an excess fare for a railway journey

Word Origin for excess

C14: from Latin excessus, from excēdere to go beyond; see exceed
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with excess

excess

see carry too far (to excess); in excess of.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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