extra

[ek-struh]

adjective

beyond or more than what is usual, expected, or necessary; additional: an extra copy of a newspaper; an extra charge.
larger or better than what is usual: an extra binding.

noun

adverb

in excess of the usual or specified amount: an extra high price.
beyond the ordinary degree; unusually; uncommonly: done extra well; extra large.

Origin of extra

First recorded in 1770–80; by shortening of extraordinary

extra-

a prefix meaning “outside,” “beyond,” freely used as an English formative: extrajudicial; extraterritorial; extra-atmospheric.
Also extro-.

Origin of extra-

< Latin, combining form of extrā (adv. and preposition) outside (of), without

ab extra

[ahb ek-strah; English ab ek-struh]

adverb Latin.

from the outside.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for extra

Contemporary Examples of extra

Historical Examples of extra

  • I have large sums of my own to invest, and it is no extra trouble to look after your money.

    Brave and Bold

    Horatio Alger

  • I had read the "Extra," with all its sickening details, and so handed it back to him.

    The Underdog

    F. Hopkinson Smith

  • The men worked as usual, nor was there any extra liquor drunk.

    Ned Myers

    James Fenimore Cooper

  • Grant repressed an impulse to shout, and used the breath for an extra burst of speed.

    Good Indian

    B. M. Bower

  • I may as well have your note of hand for that extra capital.


British Dictionary definitions for extra

extra

adjective

being more than what is usual or expected; additional

noun

a person or thing that is additional
something for which an additional charge is madethe new car had many extras
an additional edition of a newspaper, esp to report a new development or crisis
films an actor or person temporarily engaged, usually for crowd scenes
cricket a run not scored from the bat, such as a wide, no-ball, bye, or leg bye
US something that is better than usual in quality

adverb

unusually; exceptionallyan extra fast car

Word Origin for extra

C18: perhaps shortened from extraordinary

extra-

prefix

outside or beyond an area or scopeextrasensory; extraterritorial

Word Origin for extra-

from Latin extrā outside, beyond, changed from extera, from exterus outward
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for extra

1650s as a stand-alone adjective; also used as an adverb and noun in 17c. (see extra-); modern usages -- including sense of "minor performer in a play" (1777) and "special edition of a newspaper" (1793) -- all probably are from shortenings of extraordinary, which was used extensively in 18c. as noun and adverb in places we would use extra today.

extra-

only recorded in classical Latin in extraordinarius, but much used in Medieval Latin and modern formations; it represents Latin extra (adv.) "on the outside, without, except," the old fem. ablative singular of exterus "outward, outside," comparative of ex "out of" (see ex-).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

extra in Medicine

extra-

pref.

Outside; beyond:extracellular.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.