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factitive

[ fak-ti-tiv ]

adjective

, Grammar.
  1. noting or pertaining to verbs that express the idea of making or rendering in a certain way and that take a direct object and an additional word or group of words indicating the result of the process, as made in They made him king.


factitive

/ ˈfæktɪtɪv /

adjective

  1. grammar denoting a verb taking a direct object as well as a noun in apposition, as for example elect in they elected John president, where John is the direct object and president is the complement


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Derived Forms

  • ˈfactitively, adverb

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Other Words From

  • facti·tive·ly adverb

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Word History and Origins

Origin of factitive1

1840–50; < New Latin factitīvus, equivalent to factit- (stem of Latin factitāre to do often, practice, declare (someone) to be) + -īvus -ive

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Word History and Origins

Origin of factitive1

C19: from New Latin factitīvus , from Latin factitāre to do frequently, from facere to do

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Example Sentences

This word completing a transitive verb is sometimes called a factitive object, or second object, but it is a true complement.

This is also called the predicate objective or the factitive object.

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factitious disorderfactive