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fake news

[ feyk-nooz, nyooz ]
/ ˈfeɪk ˈnuz, ˈnyuz /
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noun

false news stories, often of a sensational nature, created to be widely shared or distributed for the purpose of generating revenue, or promoting or discrediting a public figure, political movement, company, etc.: It’s impossible to avoid clickbait and fake news on social media.
a parody that presents current events or other news topics for humorous effect in an obviously satirical imitation of journalism: The website publishes fake news that is hilarious and surprisingly insightful.
Sometimes Facetious. (used as a conversational tactic to dispute or discredit information that is perceived as hostile or unflattering): The senator insisted that recent polls forecasting an election loss were just fake news.

QUIZZES

QUIZ YOURSELF ON "WAS" VS. "WERE"!

Were you ready for a quiz on this topic? Well, here it is! See how well you can differentiate between the uses of "was" vs. "were" in this quiz.
Question 1 of 7
“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.

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Origin of fake news

First recorded in 1800–20 in the sense “false news, spurious news”; the current sense was first recorded in 2010–15

Words nearby fake news

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for fake news

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