Idioms for fall

Origin of fall

before 900; Middle English fallen, Old English feallan; cognate with German fallen, Old Norse falla; akin to Lithuanian pùlti to fall

OTHER WORDS FROM fall

un·fall·ing, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for fall away (1 of 3)

fall away

verb (intr, adverb)

(of friendship) to be withdrawn
to slope down

British Dictionary definitions for fall away (2 of 3)

Fall
/ (fɔːl) /

noun

the Fall theol Adam's sin of disobedience and the state of innate sinfulness ensuing from this for himself and all mankindSee also original sin

British Dictionary definitions for fall away (3 of 3)

fall
/ (fɔːl) /

verb falls, falling, fell (fɛl) or fallen (ˈfɔːlən) (mainly intr)

noun

Word Origin for fall

Old English feallan; related to Old Norse falla, Old Saxon, Old High German fallan to fall; see fell ²
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with fall away (1 of 2)

fall away

1

Also, fall off. Withdraw one's friendship, support, or allegiance. For example, After the divorce, her friends slowly fell away. [Early 1500s]

2

Also, fall off. Gradually decline in size or strength, as in The breeze slowly fell away, or, as Shakespeare put it (King Lear, 1:2): “Love cools, friendship falls off, Brothers divide.” [Early 1500s]

3

Drift from an established faith, cause, or principles. For example, I fell away from the Catholic Church when I was a teenager. [Early 1500]

Idioms and Phrases with fall away (2 of 2)

fall

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.